DeanSpaceDrive.Org

The Dean System Drive is a self-contained propulsion system not requiring the loss of mass.

Archive for the 'Inertial Navigation' Category

Apparatus for Gyroscopic Propulsion Explained

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Solid Mass-Centrifugal Propulsion System (ISA) International Space Agency

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The Antikythera Machine

More than 21 centuries ago, a mechanism of fabulous ingenuity was created in Greece, a device capable of indicating exactly how the sky would look for decades to come — the position of the moon and sun, lunar phases and even eclipses. But this incredible invention would be drowned in the sea and its secret […]

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Advanced Inertial Navigation- The AIRS FLIMBAL

The AIRS was in large part an evolutionary development of INS technology. The principle measuring instruments (the accelerometers and gyroscopes) are direct descendants of technologies used in earlier ICBM INS systems like the Minuteman II. These technologies were developed over a period 30 years by the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (formerly the Instrumentation Laboratory of MIT).

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Draper Labs at 25 years

Draper Laboratory’s roots reach back to the late 1920s and early 1930s, when
Charles Stark Draper began teaching aircraft instrumentation at MIT, all the while
dreaming of ways to improve instrument accuracy. He was an accomplished pilot,
and often performed daredevil acrobatics to make a point about the workability of a
theory. The technique underscored the point to his sometimes-startled passengers.

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Welcome to Dean Space Drive.Org

“The effect of action and reaction is not necessarily simultaneous and can be sequential.”
N.L. Dean, 1948

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Inertial Navigation

Navigation has been present for thousands of years in some
form or another. The birds, the bees, and almost everything
else in nature must be able to navigate from one point in
space to another. For people, navigation had originally
included using the sun and stars. Over the years we have
been able to develop better and more accurate sensors to
compensate for our limited range of senses. This paper will
discuss work using one of these advanced sensors, an
inertial measurement unit (IMU). This sensor, coupled with
the proper mathematical background, is capable of
detecting accelerations and angular velocities and then
transforming those into the current position and orientation
of the system.

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An Introduction to Inertial Navigation

by A. D. KING, B.Sc., F.R.I.N., Marconi Electronic Systems Ltd. A. D. King joined Ferranti in 1966, initially working on development of navigation displays for aircraft, including the Harrier and Tornado. In 1975 he became Chief Engineer of a group with responsibility for many inertial navigation systems including the guidance system for the Ariane launcher. […]

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Various Inertial Navigation Systems

STATSINGER US Pat. 3023617 – Filed Jun 1, 1953 – American Bosch Anna Corporation Filed June 1 Prior instruments based on inertial navigation systems have been proposed but as far as can be determined, they do not maintain the axes of the … GREENWOOD US Pat. 2914763 – Filed Nov 5, 1953 A. GREENWOOD, JR., […]

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