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The Dean System Drive is a self-contained propulsion system not requiring the loss of mass.

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Norman R. “Bob” Dean has passed away at the age of 85

We are sad to report that on October 7, 2016, late on a Friday evening, Norman R. Dean, the son of the inventor, Norman L. Dean, of Dean Space Drive fame, died peacefully in his sleep, he was 85. He continued to promote and rally support for the Dean Space Drive and the preceding invention, the […]

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Apparatus for Gyroscopic Propulsion Explained

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Solid Mass-Centrifugal Propulsion System (ISA) International Space Agency

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The Apollo Navigation Computer

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Gyroscopic Reaction less Propulsion Demonstrated?

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Remarkable Electromagnetic Gravity Inf from Lockheed-Martin

Former Lockheed Martin Skunkworks Senior Scientist comes out about Antigravity Propulsion Devices and how they tie into what is known as “Singularity” which allow you to move anywhere within the universe instantaneously.
Humans have this technology, and have had for more than 50 years.

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U.S. Patent 7,900,874 Harvey Emanuel Fiala (Downey, CA),

An anti-gravity device based on inertial propulsion earned U.S. Patent 7,900,874 for inventors Harvey Emanuel Fiala (Downey, CA), John Emil Fiala (Spring, TX) and John-Arthur Fiala (Spring, TX). The device they say could power flying saucers that would have abilities now attributed to UFOs, as well as cars, amusement park rides, toys and satellites. It could even be used to move comets and asteroids.

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The Antikythera Machine

More than 21 centuries ago, a mechanism of fabulous ingenuity was created in Greece, a device capable of indicating exactly how the sky would look for decades to come — the position of the moon and sun, lunar phases and even eclipses. But this incredible invention would be drowned in the sea and its secret […]

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Draper Labs at 25 years

Draper Laboratory’s roots reach back to the late 1920s and early 1930s, when
Charles Stark Draper began teaching aircraft instrumentation at MIT, all the while
dreaming of ways to improve instrument accuracy. He was an accomplished pilot,
and often performed daredevil acrobatics to make a point about the workability of a
theory. The technique underscored the point to his sometimes-startled passengers.

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Apparatus for Gyroscopic Propulsion Explained

Apparatus for Gyroscopic Propulsion Explained

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